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System Architecture

Figure 5 illustrates the TileDB system architecture. TileDB exposes a C API that allows users to submit queries to the TileDB storage manager. The C API is further wrapped with bindings for other programming languages (e.g., C++, Python, etc.). The storage manager is responsible for all IO operations that are carried out by interfacing with potentially multiple storage backends, such as the local filesystem (e.g., ext4), or distributed filesystems like HDFS, S3, etc. TileDB unifies and abstracts all these backends by letting the user specify a URI path to an array, and deriving from the URI the type of the storage backend. The storage manager handles all different backends via its virtual filesystem module.

The TileDB storage manager is a library, not a service.

A user query is typically an array read, write, or some other operations that will be discussed later on. Upon an array read/write query, the storage manager opens the array and maintains some main-memory information for it, such as the array and fragment metadata of the array. The storage manager also creates a query object.

Each query object is stateful, i.e., it maintains information about the current state of the query operation. This is important for certain types of queries as we shall explain later in this tutorial. The query keeps state about all fragments collectively (i.e., the overall array state), as well as for each fragment individually. The memory footprint of these states is rather small. The query also stores pointers to the array/fragment metadata (so that metadata are not unnecessarily replicated across concurrent queries) and the storage manager object (which is the sole module responsible for IO).

Figure 5: System architecture

Figure 5: System architecture

System Architecture